Art Contest 1st place

July, Age 14

 

Question: Does a Formal Customary Care Agreement (FCCA) pertain only to First Nation children placed in First Nation communities?

Response: Not necessarily. A child may be in a Formal Customary Care arrangement with a family that lives off reserve.


Question: Does a Formal Customary Care Agreement (FCCA) pertain only to First Nation children placed with First Nation families?

Response: No. A First Nation child may be in a FCC arrangement with a non First Nation family that lives on or off reserve.


Question: How do I determine who the Representative of the Band is?

Response: Call the First Nation administrative office (often referred to as the ‘Band office’) and state that you are calling about a child protection matter. Ask ‘Who is the Band Rep for child welfare-related matters and how can I contact this person?’ If the receptionist does not know, ask ‘’Who is the Family Service Worker or child welfare worker for your community and how can I contact this person?’ Most First Nations have a child welfare worker or family support worker that is employed by the First Nation. Sometimes these workers are situated in the Band office and sometimes they are situated in a separate building. A complete list of First Nation communities and the phone numbers for their administration offices can be found at this website: http://chiefs-of-ontario.org/directory.


Question: How do I determine if a child is a registered member of a First Nation or eligible for membership?

Response: Each First Nation maintains a membership list. Ask the child’s biological parents if either of them or their parents is affiliated with a First Nation community. Contact the First Nation administration office and ask to speak with the person responsible for maintaining the First Nation registry or membership list. Eligibility for membership can be determined at the following web site: http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/LOP/ResearchPublications/bp410-e.htm